About your Search

20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
you over and over about the economic storm headed our way partly because of europe and this fiscal lif, but i've also told you about an american economic renaissance that could be just ahead. just beyond the storm clouds. the fiscal cliff is fixable, but every day washington fails to make a deal, more damage is being doing. john king, ken rogoff and diane swan, chief economist at mezaro financial. john, right now, this is more politics than the economy. some people are saying don't sweat it. the threat of going over the fiscal cliff is overblown. it will get done. an 11th hour deal. john, as you read the politics at play, what do you see? >> i see both sides digging in. you've just played the president saying i want that rate hike. the republicans are saying mr. president, we'll give you the revenues, but not through a rate hike, but the president believes he won the election and he's upped the ante. says he wants twice as much in tax revenues than a year and a half ago, so the president believes he has the higher ground. i think maybe the democrats have a deeper trench, if you will. t
and nuclear weapons. it will result in weapons ownership. look at europe. look at japan. look at the rest of the world. we are way, way out there. we have the highest murder rate in the world. it hasn't protected us. it has resulted in arguments that should have a consequence of maybe a slap in the face, resulting in a bullet through the heart. it results in a double-murder in this case, a murder/suicide. guns don't protect. they cause suicide. >> let me bring in -- >> they cause suicide? >> i can promise, i'll get back to you, carol. here is what they say to me. i've had it all. but trying to get a debate going. i've been on two years on cnn. in that time, there's been a series of gun rages. each time it is the same debate and nothing gets done about it. 300 million guns and you have between 11,000 and 12,000 guns and murders a year. by comparison, britain has 35 as does germany and australia. japan has one or two. to countries that have strict gun control have very little gun murder. what do you say to americans who say it makes me feel safe? >> i think carole had it right. she said it
weapons and nuclear weapons. it will result in weapons ownership. look at europe and the rest of the world. we are way, way out there. we have the highest murder rate in the world. >> abbey, here is what they say to me. each time it is the same debate and nothing gets done about it. 300 million guns and you have between 11 and 12,000 guns and murders a year. britain has 35 as does germany and australia. to countries that have strict gun kcontrol have little gun murder. i think carole had it right. she said it is about personal responsibility. that is the most important part. it is a difficult one. people are going to have an oh w pinion about it. we have to make sure that they were -- wanted the american people to feel protected about the british at the time. i don't think people should be able to go online and buy guns. there should be rules in place on background checks. our country is founded on these freedoms. i totally respect the constitution by the way. what i don't respect is what i don't respect is the interpretation of the letter of the second amendment of the constitution which
murder rates. we have lower murder rates in other parts of the country than even in europe. than even where you come from. but what has created a problem in the united states, is to say in cities and schools, those are areas where we're not going to allow them to defend themselves? >> what is the murder rate in great britain for the last three years? >> it's under 3 for 100,000. >> just give me a number. >> it's actually .3 per 100,000. about a tenth of what it is in your vaunted english bucolic country, sir. the fact of the matter with guns comes safety. if the guns are in the hands of the good guys. when you say the good guys can't have guns, the bad guys have a monopoly and horrible things sufficient as shootings at schools take place. >> the ar-15 as we've seen in the last three shootings, aurora, the shopping mall in oregon and now sandy hook, the preferred weapon for young men who want to transfer hundreds of bullets of rapid fire if you have the right magazines. the president has stated he wants to ban weapons like this. what is your view? >> i think we need to ban gun control
to happen in europe, and we don't know what's going to happen in greece and we don't know what's going to have in the euro zone and the energy needs in china and india and industrialized nations. what do you think is the biggest threat from the outside to the u.s. economy? >> the fiscal cliff. first of all i think there are issues that are beginning to improve and, you know, whether you look at the euro zone which is making progress, gradually, laboriously and certainly improving and with good numbers because if you look at thinge ia because if you look at thinge a greg gat euro zone debt, and you have political stability back now that the new team is in place so the volatility and the instability factors that are outside have reduced. the real threat that we have at the moment is really here with us and that can be addressed. >> but when you look at, i mean i understood that the european banks had sort of downsized or downgraded what they thought would be growth. you've got more than 11% unemployment in the euro zone, which is a good deal higher than here. >> yeah yeah. >> are those
in europe. but, the consequences would be relatively minor. it is more exposed to it's own difficulties, and it's own issues, than to what happens elsewhere in the world, because it is such a large player. >> so we're our own 5,000 pound gor ri gorilla. >> let me ask you as a final question, january 2nd arrives, no deal, what will we notice first? >> lack of citizen, markets would react very quickly, and it would react in the stock market really taking a hit. i would say it will depend on what's on the horizon. the debt ceiling, and the long-term deficit and debt levels, that would be different. >> so that plan, even if it's a little late, would, you think, be better -- >> better comprehensive fix. >> thank you for joining us. >> when we return, the perils of doing nothing. >> reports indicate that the president has adopted a deliberate strategy to slow walk our economy right to the edge of the fiscal cliff. >> this is the same republican leadership that had the house and senate in session barely a day. i gave birth to my daughter on may 18th, five days later, i had a massive heart atta
that everybody that works in the airline industry watches that movie. i was flying in europe on another airline, and the pilot, it was a really big plane that had extra seats in the cockpit, and before we took off one of the pilots came out and said come with me, and i went into the cockpit and they strapped me in and they took off and now they can tell everybody that we flew with murdoch. >> roger murdoch. i am an airline pilot. >> that actually happened. >> what is taller? you or the statue? >> the statue is taller and it's taller than every other statue. i am closest to the street so everybody sees my statue first. >> how tall? >> 17 feet. >> it's an acknowledgment of what i achieved. >> what prompted you to write a children's book? >> i had an issue with the fact that so many kids, especially inner city kids don't think they can be a success unless they are involved in sports or entertainment. you take a young man growing up in harlem or the south side of chicago or here in atlanta and he wants to be jay-z, and he wants to be lebron james or denzel washington and he doesn't really see how w
the fiscal cliff here in the united states. >> we still have those concerns. let's focus on europe. you have the european stock averages down. the eu markets are down because the italian prime minister announced over the weekend he will resign early. earlier than had been expected. and also we got new economic data that showed japan has slipped into a technical recession. they looked at their numbers. they revised the data. japan is technically in a recession. you have more uncertainty in italy. one of the important countries. and also you have this concern happening in japan. we have this week, ben bernanke and the fed will meet at a two-day fed meeting. a lot of people are hoping to hear from the federal reserve chief that there will be some kind of on going stimulus in the form of, you know, bond buybacks or something. we'll be looking to see what he has to say about the economy. this is another big uncertainty in the markets for the week. you know, this comes after consumer spending showing as "the wall street journal" set this morning, consumer spending, consumer confidence wabbling. th
there reminds us that europe still faces a lot of hurdles before it comes out of its economic crisis. countries like greece, spain and italy have been tackling their problems with sharp cuts in spending and higher taxes and that's been fueling recession and unrest. meanwhile, we now know that japan officially slipped into its own recession over the summer with the japanese economy contracting 3.5% between july and september. now, the previous quarter, the previous three months number was also revised lower and that makes for two consecutive quarters of negative growth and that's the classic definition of a recession. from asia, back to america, literally, a group of chinese investors agreed today to buy an 80% stake in aig's aircraft leasing business. back in 2008, the insurance giant was bailed out by the u.s. government to the tune of $180 billion. four years on, still paying back the money by selling off assets including the aircraft leasing unit that complemented aig's airplane insurance business. if u.s. regulators apro s appro deal, it will be one of the largest ever by chinese investors.
throw shows in the uk and three shows in eastern europe. it was incredible. it was such an honor. to be on stage with brian mann, roger taylor, rock royalty. it was kind of intimidating. the first show, we were in the ukraine, and it was 250,000 people. i had to take a big deep breath and just push through. >> what's it look like when you're performing to a quarter million people? >> it's bizarre. it's surreal. >> you focus on one person in the audience and sing to them. >> i tried not to. i tried to turn my focus inside to the boys. >> you did radio ga-ga? >> with the claps, yeah. >> great song. >> and you did some work for the gay marriage initiative in maryland. are you excited or nervous the supreme court is hearing the case on proposition 8 in california? >> i'm excited. i think progress is the name of the game. as long as we continue to try to push forward, things will change. slow and steady, you know. >> we're excited. "divas" airs sunday on vh1. >> yes, sunday. some of the people that are going to be there. jordin sparks. demi lovato, ciera, kelly rowland. >> congressman
to respond. multiple sources in the u.s., europe and the arab world tell cnn there's no indication assad is ready to leave syria. >> is he the type of person that would take asylum or will he go down fighting? >> i think there's a chance he will huddle, it's whether his sect will want to huddle with him or not. he's been a failure as a president. >> reporter: the sect he's talking about are the offshoot of shiite islam, a small minority that assad's family is a part of. if assad does leave, could he be investigated eventually captured on war crimes charges. >> ecuador, venezuela, cuba are countries where he could feel safe for the time being. he has to be concerned about a shift in the winds and any of those governments as well. and certainly no one expects the regime to continue indefinitely. >> right now, those nations leaders are more sympathetic to assad. there's another ally even closer. >> couldn't he just go to iran, is that a more feasible location? >> it's easier for him to go to iran, it's a shorter flight. in the end the islamic republic is the place where president assad and
of those latin american governments. multiple sources in the u.s., europe, and the arab world tell cnn there's no indication assad is ready to leave syria. >> is he the kind of person that would take asylum or will he go down fighting? >> i think there's a real chance that he will huddle along with his sect. the question is whether his sect will want them to huddle with them or not. he has been a failure as a president. he is a very irradic personality. >> andrew has met al assad several times and has worked with his wife. the sect he is talking about are an off chute of shia islam, that dominate syrian politics. if assad does leave, could he be investigated, eventually captured on war crimes charges? >> ecuador, venezuela, cuba, are countries where he could feel safe for the time being, but he has to be concerned about a shift in the winds and any of those governments as well. certainly no one expects the regime in those three states to continue indefinitely. >> they are more sympathetic to ass assad, but there's another ally even closer. >> couldn't he just go to iran? isn't that mor
.2 million prize to the 27-nation bloc in october. they say the group has turned europe from a continent of war to a continent of peace in the six decades following world war ii. not everyone thinks the award is justified. there are some critics that are angry about how the eu handle the crisis. italy markets plunged at news that the italian prime minister plans to step down later this month. he's going to wait until the national budget is passed, but investors are concerned about how it might affect the country's high levels of the debt. it means the former prime minister that led office after corruption allegations could make a comeback. >>> i want to get a look at stocks right here, how they are doing. up 33 points. looking at the dow jones, pretty good read so far. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 when i'm trading, i'm so into it, tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 hours can go by before i realize tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 that i haven't even looked away from my screen. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 that kind of focus... tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 that's what i have when i trade. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1
with the secretary. >> reporter: wolf, there's a new press for diplomacy on syria with the secretary here in europe. as concern mounts that syrian president bashar al assad might use chemical weapons, secretary of state hillary clinton makes a new diplomatic push to end the conflict in syria. >> events on the ground in syria are accelerating. and we see that in many different ways. the pressure against the regime in and around damascus seems to be increasing. >> reporter: in dublin for a security conference, clinton met twice with russian foreign minister sergei in their one-on-one meeting discussing one thing they agree on need to set a line for the use or loss of control over syria's chemical weapons. the second meeting held behind closed doors at the russian insis tans including wanting to work out a process to get syria back from the brink. so far moscow has blocked action of president assad at the united nations insisting there should be no regime change. but diplomats now say moscow increasingly doubts assad can survive in power as the armed opposition gains ground. some u.s. senators say now
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (31 Dec 2014)